Golden brown has been the consummate color name for baking and roasting since 1891, as recorded in English language recipes. And since peanuts can be dry roasted and milled to produce such a range of colors and flavors the USDA Standards for Grades of Peanut Butter specify just four browns; relative to their hue and intensity.  The first reference of peanut butter paired with jelly on bread was published in 1901 by Julia Davis Chandler in the Boston Cooking-School Magazine of Culinary Science and Domestic Economics. Coincidentally, it wasn’t the 1928 and 1933 patents of the bread slicing machine and moka pot, but the social and economic factors after WWII, that democratized the PB&J sandwich and stove-top espresso across the U.S. and Europe.  In this Photo, our METALSTAR SuperEco 10 series ink for offset printing is comprised of “rich gold” metallic pigments matched to PANTONE 872. That brilliant opaque ink is paired here with SYMIC pearlescent pigments for use in coating applications.

Golden brown has been the consummate color name for baking and roasting since 1891, as recorded in English language recipes. And since peanuts can be dry roasted and milled to produce such a range of colors and flavors the USDA Standards for Grades of Peanut Butter specify just four browns; relative to their hue and intensity.

The first reference of peanut butter paired with jelly on bread was published in 1901 by Julia Davis Chandler in the Boston Cooking-School Magazine of Culinary Science and Domestic Economics. Coincidentally, it wasn’t the 1928 and 1933 patents of the bread slicing machine and moka pot, but the social and economic factors after WWII, that democratized the PB&J sandwich and stove-top espresso across the U.S. and Europe.

In this Photo, our METALSTAR SuperEco 10 series ink for offset printing is comprised of “rich gold” metallic pigments matched to PANTONE 872. That brilliant opaque ink is paired here with SYMIC pearlescent pigments for use in coating applications.

 Café au lait was first recorded as a color name in 1839 to affirm the look of blending dark roasted coffee with heated milk. The Café du Monde Coffee Stand opened in 1862 and, with Union naval blockades cutting off the port of New Orleans during the American Civil War, their proprietary ratio of roasted chicory root with robusta and arabica coffee beans extended the familiar earthy brown undertones and creamy white overtones.  The timeless combination of NOLA style café au lait and powdered sugar covered beignets is reflected in the blend of rich gold and pale gold liquid inks, matched to PANTONE® 874, and the effect coated glass flake Luxan powder. Respectively, they provide the graphic arts market with metallic brilliance and pearlescent shimmer for printing and coating projects.  In this photo, our ROTOSTAR Aqua FP 06-70654 is a water-based liquid ink for flexo printing and the LUXAN Interference Silver is available in B-F particle size grades; with B-E grades also available with weather resistance as the CFX series.

Café au lait was first recorded as a color name in 1839 to affirm the look of blending dark roasted coffee with heated milk. The Café du Monde Coffee Stand opened in 1862 and, with Union naval blockades cutting off the port of New Orleans during the American Civil War, their proprietary ratio of roasted chicory root with robusta and arabica coffee beans extended the familiar earthy brown undertones and creamy white overtones.

The timeless combination of NOLA style café au lait and powdered sugar covered beignets is reflected in the blend of rich gold and pale gold liquid inks, matched to PANTONE® 874, and the effect coated glass flake Luxan powder. Respectively, they provide the graphic arts market with metallic brilliance and pearlescent shimmer for printing and coating projects.

In this photo, our ROTOSTAR Aqua FP 06-70654 is a water-based liquid ink for flexo printing and the LUXAN Interference Silver is available in B-F particle size grades; with B-E grades also available with weather resistance as the CFX series.

 Gold bronze effect pigments are the modern copper-zinc alloy that the Greek philosopher Plato called Orichalcum, later adapted to the Latin word Aurichalcum for “golden-copper”, in his story of Atlantis from the Critias dialogue recorded in the 4th Century BC.  Earlier this year, ingots of Orichalcum cast primarily with 75-80% copper and 15-20% zinc were recovered from a 2,600 year old shipwreck near Sicily. That metallurgical ratio is close to the Rich Pale Gold color matched to PANTONE® 873.  In this photo, the leafing properties of the cornflake shaped gold bronze STANDART pigments in our LITHOFLEX paste preserve the brilliance often lost in the fine flake grading required for conventional offset printing ink systems.*

Gold bronze effect pigments are the modern copper-zinc alloy that the Greek philosopher Plato called Orichalcum, later adapted to the Latin word Aurichalcum for “golden-copper”, in his story of Atlantis from the Critias dialogue recorded in the 4th Century BC.

Earlier this year, ingots of Orichalcum cast primarily with 75-80% copper and 15-20% zinc were recovered from a 2,600 year old shipwreck near Sicily. That metallurgical ratio is close to the Rich Pale Gold color matched to PANTONE® 873.

In this photo, the leafing properties of the cornflake shaped gold bronze STANDART pigments in our LITHOFLEX paste preserve the brilliance often lost in the fine flake grading required for conventional offset printing ink systems.*

 Silver is a chemical element with the symbol Ag, which is short for Argentum in Latin meaning “gray” or “shiny.” It is a white and lustrous precious metal with the highest reflectivity of any metal in the periodic table. Thus, the metallic brilliance of silver can only be reproduced by providing high light reflection and low light scattering above and beyond the tints and shades of gray colored flip-flop effects.  Thanks to the Hall-Héroult process for aluminum smelting, that metal has long represented silver brilliance as pigments within printing inks as well as paints, coatings, cosmetics and other effect applications. For mirror-like silver representation, ECKART manufactures aluminum pigments through the physical vapor deposition (PVD) process in a product branded METALURE®.  For premium and standard silver effects, we also produce silver dollar and cornflake pigments that comprise PANTONE® 10077 and 877, respectively. In this photo, our METALURE pigment is formulated into a paste ink branded TOPSTAR for conventional and UV offset, as well as the liquid ink ULTRASTAR for flexo, screen and gravure printing processes.*

Silver is a chemical element with the symbol Ag, which is short for Argentum in Latin meaning “gray” or “shiny.” It is a white and lustrous precious metal with the highest reflectivity of any metal in the periodic table. Thus, the metallic brilliance of silver can only be reproduced by providing high light reflection and low light scattering above and beyond the tints and shades of gray colored flip-flop effects.

Thanks to the Hall-Héroult process for aluminum smelting, that metal has long represented silver brilliance as pigments within printing inks as well as paints, coatings, cosmetics and other effect applications. For mirror-like silver representation, ECKART manufactures aluminum pigments through the physical vapor deposition (PVD) process in a product branded METALURE®.

For premium and standard silver effects, we also produce silver dollar and cornflake pigments that comprise PANTONE® 10077 and 877, respectively. In this photo, our METALURE pigment is formulated into a paste ink branded TOPSTAR for conventional and UV offset, as well as the liquid ink ULTRASTAR for flexo, screen and gravure printing processes.*

 Copper is a chemical element with the symbol Cu on the periodic table, which is short for cuprum; the late Latin word referencing the island of Cyprus where the Roman Empire mined copper ore. Pure copper has a red-orange color before oxidation and moisture shifts those colors brown then green, respectively. To counteract that natural verdigris Zinc is another chemical element blended with copper for color stability.  Post consumer copper wire has the insulation removed by metal recyclers who provide it to the ECKART foundry as finely chopped granules for re-melting at 1,984°F in our energy efficient electromagnetic induction furnace. The liquid copper is then transferred by crucibles to a spray furnace where the molten metal is atomized into solid granules. Those coarse copper granules are dry milled until becoming fine enough to pass through a series of cyclones and screens, in a continuous process, before polishing and blending for color consistency as an ink-ready effect pigment.  In this photo, our METALSTAR SuperGloss 07-4876 and 07-2006 paste inks are matched to PANTONE® 876 Copper and 877 Silver for offset printing. Unlike transparent process colors, their opaque nature provide for effective under-printing, over-printing and integrated printing results.*

Copper is a chemical element with the symbol Cu on the periodic table, which is short for cuprum; the late Latin word referencing the island of Cyprus where the Roman Empire mined copper ore. Pure copper has a red-orange color before oxidation and moisture shifts those colors brown then green, respectively. To counteract that natural verdigris Zinc is another chemical element blended with copper for color stability.

Post consumer copper wire has the insulation removed by metal recyclers who provide it to the ECKART foundry as finely chopped granules for re-melting at 1,984°F in our energy efficient electromagnetic induction furnace. The liquid copper is then transferred by crucibles to a spray furnace where the molten metal is atomized into solid granules. Those coarse copper granules are dry milled until becoming fine enough to pass through a series of cyclones and screens, in a continuous process, before polishing and blending for color consistency as an ink-ready effect pigment.

In this photo, our METALSTAR SuperGloss 07-4876 and 07-2006 paste inks are matched to PANTONE® 876 Copper and 877 Silver for offset printing. Unlike transparent process colors, their opaque nature provide for effective under-printing, over-printing and integrated printing results.*

 Golden is an English color name recognized around 1300 for yellow-orange blends representative of the chemical element and transition metal gold. To accurately reproduce “golden” through the subtractive color process of offset lithography, metallic pigments must be included as either a silver ink printed under transparent yellow and orange inks or by blending them into one spot color.  The optical brilliance of metallic pigments for printing inks provides the dimension and movement a viewer perceives in otherwise flat and static images. Silver dollar shaped pigments are metal flakes with rounded surface and edge geometry that reflect light more directly to enhance brilliance.  In this photo, our paste ink METALSTAR 06 7500 comprises the non-leafing PANTONE® Silver 10077 C that is blended with PANTONE Yellow 012 C and PANTONE Orange 021C  to make PANTONE 10123 C of the Premium Metallics series.*

Golden is an English color name recognized around 1300 for yellow-orange blends representative of the chemical element and transition metal gold. To accurately reproduce “golden” through the subtractive color process of offset lithography, metallic pigments must be included as either a silver ink printed under transparent yellow and orange inks or by blending them into one spot color.

The optical brilliance of metallic pigments for printing inks provides the dimension and movement a viewer perceives in otherwise flat and static images. Silver dollar shaped pigments are metal flakes with rounded surface and edge geometry that reflect light more directly to enhance brilliance.

In this photo, our paste ink METALSTAR 06 7500 comprises the non-leafing PANTONE® Silver 10077 C that is blended with PANTONE Yellow 012 C and PANTONE Orange 021C  to make PANTONE 10123 C of the Premium Metallics series.*

 Aluminum bars were exhibited with the French crown jewels at the Exposition Universelle of 1855, because the production cost was greater than gold at that time. That was until the invention of the Hall–Héroult process for aluminum smelting in 1886, then the manufacture of aluminum foil from 1910, whose by-products were granules for wet milling into pigment.  After WWII, the optical effects of silver and gold-bronze pigments provided value for the automotive, cosmetics, paint, printing and plastics industries. The metallic brilliance of these flake-shaped pigments is a balance of directional light reflection from the surface and scattered light at the edges.  In this photo, our “cornflake” shaped aluminum pigments comprise leafing printing inks matched to PANTONE® 877 C. ECKART has formulated our METALSTAR and ROTOSTAR inks for offset, flexo, gravure, and rotary screen printing.*   

Aluminum bars were exhibited with the French crown jewels at the Exposition Universelle of 1855, because the production cost was greater than gold at that time. That was until the invention of the Hall–Héroult process for aluminum smelting in 1886, then the manufacture of aluminum foil from 1910, whose by-products were granules for wet milling into pigment.

After WWII, the optical effects of silver and gold-bronze pigments provided value for the automotive, cosmetics, paint, printing and plastics industries. The metallic brilliance of these flake-shaped pigments is a balance of directional light reflection from the surface and scattered light at the edges.

In this photo, our “cornflake” shaped aluminum pigments comprise leafing printing inks matched to PANTONE® 877 C. ECKART has formulated our METALSTAR and ROTOSTAR inks for offset, flexo, gravure, and rotary screen printing.*

 

 Gold was hammered into leafing for art and architecture from 2500 B.C. in Egypt. Gold dust was the byproduct of that handcraft and, consequently, it became a pigment for mixing into printing inks and varnishes. Both the brilliance and cost of gold were evident, so in 1760 a craftsman in Fürth, Germany named Albert Huber innovatively substituted gold for the brass alloy of copper-zinc.  This new pigment was termed gold-bronze and its metallic brilliance matched pure gold for flake size and surface finish; reflecting a comparable amount of light back to the human eye. Brilliance and color accuracy are enhanced when flakes are smooth, large, leafing and tightly distributed.  Here, our ROTOSTAR UV liquid ink is comprised of leafing bronze pigments matched to  PANTONE®  875 C for flexographic printing. Which includes secondary food packaging on paper, board and film substrates for self adhesive labels and folding carton applications.*

Gold was hammered into leafing for art and architecture from 2500 B.C. in Egypt. Gold dust was the byproduct of that handcraft and, consequently, it became a pigment for mixing into printing inks and varnishes. Both the brilliance and cost of gold were evident, so in 1760 a craftsman in Fürth, Germany named Albert Huber innovatively substituted gold for the brass alloy of copper-zinc.

This new pigment was termed gold-bronze and its metallic brilliance matched pure gold for flake size and surface finish; reflecting a comparable amount of light back to the human eye. Brilliance and color accuracy are enhanced when flakes are smooth, large, leafing and tightly distributed.

Here, our ROTOSTAR UV liquid ink is comprised of leafing bronze pigments matched to PANTONE® 875 C for flexographic printing. Which includes secondary food packaging on paper, board and film substrates for self adhesive labels and folding carton applications.*